Undergraduate Studies
Undergraduate Studies
Undergraduate
Studies
Engineering

Engineering

With an engineering degree from Eastern Nazarene College, you can make a difference in the world. You can help solve problems that are important to society, like early earthquake detection, and contribute your knowledge to a variety of fields, including aerospace, pharmaceuticals, medicine, and more.

Overview

The Engineering Department at Eastern Nazarene College is committed to excellence, innovation, undergraduate research, and personal and intellectual growth in a diverse and collaborative Christian community. Students are provided with the tools and resources required to be successful scientists and engineers, preparing them to pursue graduate studies and respond to evolving challenges in the world. Eastern Nazarene College provides students with a unique, well-rounded academic experience that is project-driven, including senior design/research and internship opportunities

Well-rounded Education: General education requirements are emphasized to develop engineering students into well-rounded individuals. Corporations, research labs, and graduate programs seek students who have the ability to work well with people from diverse backgrounds and who understand diverse points of view. Other four-year programs require students to complete two electives whereas Eastern Nazarene College provides students with the breadth and depth of education they will need to be successful in their profession.

Project Driven: Two laboratory projects are included in all advanced technical courses. This provides students with exposure to advanced lab work, beyond the illustration of basic theoretical concepts. This exposure is a precursor to work experience, which is valued by corporations, research labs and graduate schools who seek students with design experience right out of college.

Internships: Students benefit from the college’s collaboration with Corporate and Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU). Partnerships with the private and public sectors allow students to participate in internship opportunities that fit their specific areas of interest by their junior year. Most engineering students complete two internships before graduation.

Senior Design Course Sequence: Students are required to complete a three-semester course sequence with the goal of contributing to science and/or technology. In this process, engineering students develop a product using basic principles of systems engineering. Students may also contribute to science by advancing the current state of scientific knowledge through innovative and original research, providing students with practical experience before graduation. The senior design/research course sequence is as follows:

  • First semester: Students choose an original (new) problem and conduct survey and patent search. The end result of this sequence is an architecture solution to the chosen problem or a hypothesis with research procedures.
  • Second semester: Students use the abstract architecture from the first sequence and turn it into a product by replacing the abstract boxes in the architecture with hardware and software. In the case of research, students use the scientific method to collect data in order to verify their hypothesis and arrive at final results and conclusions.
  • Third semester: Students develop both a technical and a layman presentation to defend their thesis in the prestigious John U Free seminar series. Students are also required to publish a paper in a peer reviewed journal.

The Environment: Eastern Nazarene College provides a safe, Christian environment for personal and intellectual exploration. A low faculty-to-student ratio in both classes and labs creates a supportive academic atmosphere where students are encouraged to do their best work. Studying engineering at Eastern Nazarene College, students have access to an advanced technology lab with super computer for advanced computation, laser labs, and advanced laboratory equipment in support of fundamental research on earthquake forecasting. Also available are a signal and systems laboratory, advanced communication equipment for systems design, advanced laboratory equipment for computer architecture design, and advanced laboratory equipment for circuits and electronics including spectrum analyzers.

Eastern Nazarene College & NASA AMES Research

The Physics and Engineering Department at Eastern Nazarene College began to work on scientific methods for earthquake forecasting in the summer of 2013. At the time, very few organizations, with the exception of the NASA AMES Research Center, understood the potential of this science. From 2013 to 2015, the college developed a data assimilation and fusion platform for earthquake forecasting based on the idea that at the onset of an earthquake, the earth’s many voices are silently being unleashed from the deep to reveal changes in dynamics below the earth, to the earth’s surface and all the way to the earth’s atmosphere. These voices were later found to be intimately connected to tectonic plate motions of the earth characteristic of seismic activities announcing the arrival of earthquakes.

Engineering Eastern Nazarene College NASA

The CUBE, a machine created by NASA AMES, is based on the data assimilation and fusion platform concept developed at Eastern Nazarene College.

This technology provided hope, for the first time in the history of earthquakes, that in the near future, a method could be developed that would allow people to forecast the magnitude, geographical location and time of earthquakes, days to weeks before they arrive, just like meteorological forecasts.

The NASA Ames Research Center understood and endorsed the concept proposed by the Physics and Engineering Department at Eastern Nazarene College. NASA AMES developed a data assimilation machine called the CUBE that they have been using over the last few years in the USA (Alaska and California) and Central America (Peru and Guatemala). The CUBE system is now getting ready to deploy in the Caribbean (Haiti and Santo Domingo) and Mexico. Recently, NASA signed a memorandum of understanding with the Haitian Government to start an earthquake forecasting pilot project using science and technology developed at Eastern Nazarene College.

Career Paths

Eastern Nazarene College students have participated in internships and research at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Museum of Science-Boston, South Shore Science Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Raytheon Corporation, Lockheed Martin Corporation, BAE systems, MITRE Corporation, Altus Engineering, HCL America, Booz, Allen and Hamilton, QuakeFinder, NASA’s Ames Research Center, Enterasys, National Instruments, Prism Energy, Vertica, National Security Agency, Novartis, Gores and Associates, Faith Technologies, Cognosante, MIT, Zade Company, Shield Laboratory, John Hopkins, Applied Physics Laboratory (APl), Space, and the Naval Warfare Laboratory (SPAWAR).

Graduates have gone to work for major corporations and research facilities. Over the past 10 years, more than 80% of students have been accepted to graduate or professional schools. Graduates have attended Harvard University, Georgia Tech, Northeastern University, Vanderbilt University, University of Massachusetts, University of Tennessee, University of Delaware, Lehigh University, Nazarene Theological Seminary, Sacred Heart University, and the University of Maryland.

Engineering Department Objectives
  • To prepare our students for professional employment and/or graduate studies in physics or engineering.
  • To develop worldly citizens that can project to their environments, a healthy mix of our core beliefs that “the best in education can meaningfully coexist with the best in Christian faith.”
  • To prepare students to seamlessly apply their comprehensive preparation in general education to problems in the engineering disciplines.
  • To prepare students to use their comprehensive preparation in general education to develop and enhance their intellectual and artistic curiosity.
  • To prepare students to use their general and technical preparation towards demonstrating their writing, speaking, and reading proficiency.
  • To prepare students to use their general education and technical preparation to live their lives as scientists and engineers inspired and guided by their Christian faith.
  • To prepare students to use their general education and technical preparation to develop awareness and sensitivity to cultural diversity.

 

Engineering Degrees, Programs, and Tracks
  • Bachelor of Science: Electrical Engineering; Computer Engineering; General Engineering 
  • Bachelor of Arts: Engineering Studies 
  • Minor: Engineering  
General Degree and Education Requirements

GENERAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

  • Fulfill all General Education Requirements – see below 
  • Earn minimum of 123 Graduation Credits 
  • Pass Department Comprehensive Exam 
  • Meet minimum Cumulative GPA of 2.0 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS – 46 credits required 

  • Cultural Perspectives Requirements, 32 credits 
  • Physical Education Skills, 2 credits 
  • Lab Science required: PY201/PY201L General Physics I, 5 credits 
  • Math required: MA151 Calculus I, 4 credits 
  • Social Science, 3 credits 
Engineering Core Requirements (BS)

48 Credits

Systems/General Engineering Sequence (all required), minimum grade C-, 13 credits 

  • EG161/EG161L Introduction to Robotics w/Lab 4 
  • EG325 Introduction to Engineering Design 3 
  • EG451-A Senior Design Project 3 
  • EG451-B Senior Design Presentation 3 

Analog Sequence (all required), minimum grade C-, 15 credits 

  • EG272/EG272L Circuit Theory I w/Lab 4 
  • EG273/EG273L Circuit Theory II w/Lab 4  
  • EG321/EG321L Electronics w/Lab 4 
  • EG332L Applied Electric Circuits 3 

Digital Sequence (all required), minimum grade C-, 11 credits 

  • EG232/EG232L Digital Logic w/Lab 4 
  • EG351/EG351L Microcomputer Interfacing w/Lab 4 
  • EG432 Embedded Systems 3 

Programming Sequence (all required), minimum grade C-, 9 credits 

  • CS131 Computer Programming I 3 
  • CS132 Computer Programming II 3 
  • EG452 Applied Programming 3 
Computer Engineering Requirements (BS)
  • Fulfill all General Degree Requirements
  • Fulfill all General Education Requirements – 46 credits
  • Fulfill all Engineering Core Requirements –  48 credits

Computer Engineering (BS) Additional Requirements, minimum grade C-, 6 credits 

  • CS221 Data Structures & Algorithms 3 
  • CS310 Data Telecommunications and Networks 3 

Computer Engineering (BS) Cognates, minimum grade C-, 15 credits  

  • MA152 Calculus II 4 
  • MA171 Introduction to Discrete Math 3 
  • MA252 Probability and Statistics 3 
  • PY202/PY202L General Physics II w/Lab 5 

 Computer Engineering (BS) Recommended Elective 

  • MA201 Linear Algebra 4 
Electrical Engineering Requirements (BS)
  • Fulfill all General Degree Requirements
  • Fulfill all General Education Requirements – 46 credits
  • Fulfill all Engineering Core Requirements – 48 credits

Electrical Engineering (BS) Additional Requirements, minimum grade C-, 11 credits 

  • EG401 Signals and Systems 3 
  • PY312/PY312L Applied Mechanics w/Lab 4 
  • PY322/PY322L Electricity and Magnetism w/Lab 4

Electrical Engineering (BS) Cognates, minimum grade C-, 19 credits 

  • MA152 Calculus II 4 
  • MA211 Calculus III 3 
  • MA212 Differential Equations 3 
  • PY202/PY202L General Physics II w/Lab 5 
  • PY301/PY301L Modern Physics I w/Lab 4 

 Electrical Engineering (BS) Recommended Electives 

  • PY472 Electromagnetic Theory 3 
  • MA201 Linear Algebra 4 
General Engineering (BA and Minor)
  • Fulfill all General Degree Requirements
  • Fulfill all General Education Requirements – 46 credits
  • Engineering Studies Core Requirements, minimum grade C-, 24 credits 
  • CS131 Computer Programming I 3 
  • EG161/EG161L Introduction to Robotics w/Lab 4 
  • EG232/EG232L Digital Logic w/Lab 4 
  • EG272/EG272L Circuit Theory w/Lab 4 
  • EG325 Introduction to Engineering Design 3 
  • EG451-A Senior Design Project 3 
  • EG451-B Senior Design Presentation 3 
  • Engineering Elective (choose two), minimum grade C-, minimum 6 credits 
  • CS132 Computer Programming II 3 
  • EG321/EG321L Electronics w/Lab 4 
  • EG351/EG351L Microcomputer Interfacing w/Lab 4 

GENERAL ENGINEERING 

The General Engineering degree is intended for students specializing in an engineering track other than Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, and Engineering Studies.  A course of study is designed in consultation with the student’s adviser after the fall semester of the sophomore year. In addition to courses within the major, all General Engineering students must complete the General Education requirements. 

ENGINEERING MINOR, minimum grade C-, 15 credits 

Students may choose 15 credits in any courses with an EG prefix. 

Engineering Course Descriptions

EG161 Introduction to Robotics (3 credits)  

This course introduces our students to the field of Engineering. The students will design and build a LEGO computer controlled robot. Topics include electronic instrumentation, elementary work with circuits, computer interfacing, and computer programming. An engineer is called upon to solve practical problems. In order to accomplish this task, he/she needs to piece together various components developed by other engineers as well as acquire knowledge from other engineers. By combining the power of the LEGO building system with the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education technology, teams of students can design, build, program, and test robots. Working together on guided and open-ended engineering projects, the team members can develop creativity and problem-solving skills along with other important Scientific, Technological, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) knowledge. Students also become more skilled in communication, organization and research, all helping to prepare them for future success in higher levels of schooling and in the workplace. The students will also have an opportunity to “Design their own Process of Becoming a World-Class Engineering Student.” “Design Your Process (DYP)” is a powerful student-centered approach for bringing about change in students’ attitudes and behaviors and turning the task of figuring out the path to success over to the individual.

EG161L Introduction to Robotics Lab (1 credit) 

This lab introduces our students to the field of Engineering. The student designs and builds a LEGO computer controlled robot. Topics include electronic instrumentation, elementary work with circuits, electronics, digital logic, basic programming and computer architecture. An engineer is called upon to solve practical problems. In order to accomplish this, he/she needs to piece together various components developed by other engineers as well as acquire knowledge from other engineers. By combining the power of the LEGO building system with the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education technology, teams of students can design, build, program, and test robots. Working together on guided and open-ended engineering projects, the team members can develop creativity and problem-solving skills along with other important mathematics and science knowledge. Students also become more skilled in communication,organization and research, all helping to prepare them for future success in higher levels of schooling and for the workplace. The ultimate prize is the students’ robotics design competition.  

Co-requisite: EG161. EG232 Digital Logic (3 credits)  

This course provides an introduction to the Hardware building blocks used in Digital computers. The course will cover basic gates, Boolean Algebra, multiplexers, arithmetic functions, combinational and sequential circuit synthesis, as well as flip/flops, counters, busses and registers. Different digital logic design techniques will be covered. The course ends with the design of one of the most fundamental building blocks of all computers: the Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU). 

Co-requisite: EG232L. EG232L Digital Logic Lab (1 credit) 

This lab provides an introduction to the practical Hardware building blocks used in Digital computers. The lab will cover the implementation of multiplexers, arithmetic functions, as well as combinational and sequential circuits. The course ends with the design and implementation of one of the most fundamental building blocks of all computers: the Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU).  

Co-requisite: EG232. EG272 Circuit Theory I (3 credits)  

This course will provide a basic introduction to circuit theory. We will study basic electrical concepts; network theorems; circuit laws; resistance, op-amps, capacitance, inductance, response of first order (RC and RL) circuits to initial conditions and step forcing functions.  

Pre-requisite: PY202, MA212. Co-requisite: EG272L. EG272L Circuit Theory I Lab (1 credit)  

This course will provide a basic introduction to practical circuit theory. We will examine fundamental circuit elements such as resistors, inductors, capacitors and OpAmps. We will examine the behavior of these components in different circuit configurations. We will estimate the performance of various circuits configuration using background from circuit analysis techniques learned in EG272. We will use the Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE), to examine several circuit configurations and to evaluate their performances.  

Co-requisite: EG272. EG273 Circuit Theory II (3 credits)  

This course is a continuation of Circuit Theory I. We will study Laplace and Z-transforms and explore circuit analysis using these transforms. We will explore the concepts of frequency domain convolution, Fourier series and transforms, transfer functions, poles and zeros, frequency response, resonance, and the use of Bode plots in the analysis of the asymptotic frequency response of various circuit configurations. We will use Bode plots as a platform for the analysis of linear feedback and control circuitry. We will look at polyphase AC circuits; magnetically-coupled circuits as well as the more open concept of two-port networks. Computer design and simulations are integrated via PSPICE and MATLAB. 

Prerequisite: PY202. Co-requisite: EG273L. EG273L Circuit Theory II Lab (1 credit)  

This course will expose our students to practical advanced circuit theory. We will examine the resonant behavior of RLC circuits. We will use RLC circuits as a platform for investigating transfer functions concepts via convolution, Fourier Series and Transforms as well as Laplace and Z-Transforms. We will investigate frequency response, resonance, and the use of magnetically coupled circuits in steady state. We will use PSPICE to examine several circuit configurations from EG272 and to evaluate their performances.  

Co-requisite: EG273. EG321 Electronics (3 credits)  

This course will provide a basic introduction to electronics. We will examine fundamental electronic circuit elements such as Diodes, Operational Amplifiers, Metal Oxide Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET), Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT). We will discuss the use of transistors in real time electronic circuit configurations such as linear feedback and control. Additionally, we will study several techniques that can be used to analyze and understand some very complicated circuits using basic electronic circuit building blocks. Computer design and simulations are integrated via PSPICE and MATLAB.  

Prerequisite: EG272. Co-requisite: EG321L. EG321L Electronics Lab (1 credit)  

This course will provide an introduction to Analog and Digital Electronic circuit applications. The course will cover Operational amplifier and diode designs and applications, Zener regulators and applications, BJT and MOSFET applications in Integrated Circuit (IC), input/output impedance and applications to Thevenin and Norton equivalents, frequency characteristics of active filters and applications.  

Co-Requisite: EG321. EG325 Introduction to Engineering Design (3 credits)  

This course provides an introduction to implementing an engineering project using basic principles of systems engineering or a scientific research project working together with faculty and/or in collaboration with research I universities as well as the corporate sector. Students will investigate topics towards the proposal of a research or product development project. Students will develop schedule, objectives and projected outcomes. In the case of an engineering project, system requirements, function allocations, systems cost and schedule will be developed and examined in great details. In the case of a research project, preliminary investigations in line with ongoing research or new contribution in Engineering, Physics or related fields will be used as a platform and basis for conducting on site research with faculty or contributing to research projects in research programs around the United States.  

Prerequisite: EG451-A, EG451-B and Junior standing. EG332L
Applied Electronics Circuits (3 credits)

This course is a continuation of EG321. The students will learn the practical use of electronic circuit designs. Electronic circuit applications applied to transducer designs will be explored in great detail. Advanced electronic circuit applications such as: operational amplifier design, linear feedback and control, radio and radar communication, signal processing, Analog to Digital Conversion, Schmitt triggers and embedded systems electronics. Power electronics and applications of Very LargeScale Integrated Circuits (VLSI) will be explored.  

Prerequisite: EG272, EG273, EG321. EG351/CS220 Microcomputer Interfacing (3 credits)  

Introduces the field of microcomputers. Topics include microcomputer organization and architecture, Von Neumann versus Harvard architecture, machine and assembly language programming, registers and register transfer logic, assembly instructions and fetching cycle, interrupts, serial and parallel interfacing, D/A and A/D interfaces, user interfaces such as keypad, push buttons and LCD displays, counters and timing of internal clocks using interrupts, interrupt handling and programming, etc.  

Prerequisite: MA171. Cross-listed with CS220. EG351L/CS220L Microcomputer Interfacing Lab (1 credit)  

Laboratory experience in assembly, level programming, and debugging, as well as fabrication of microcomputer interfacing circuitry. Projects include human/computer interfacing, A/D conversion and serial communication.  

Co-requisite: EG351/CS220. EG401 Signals and Systems (3 credits)  

This course will cover time and frequency domain analysis of signals and systems. The basic principles of convolutions, linearity, time invariance, causality, and stability of systems will be discussed as the basis for understanding signals and systems. The more advanced concepts of signals representation and modeling will be covered in topics such as: Fourier series and transforms, Laplace and Z-transforms. This course ends with a look at the role of signals and systems in communication, control and linear feedback.  

Prerequisites: EG332L. EG412L Applied Digital Signals Processing (4 credits)  

This course covers the analysis and processing of discrete-time signals. Topics include digitization of analog signals, sampling theory, the Z transform, digital filter design using both FIR and IIR, as well as spectral analysis using both the DFT and FFT. Differences between deterministic and probabilistic signal processing are explored in great details. The innovative EMONA TIMS system is used to illustrate the Hardware implementation of basic systems. In addition, extensive use of MatLab is made for practical implementation of the theory covered in lectures.  

Prerequisite: EG401. EG432 Embedded Systems (3 credits)  

Embedded Systems design will extend and integrate concepts from coursework in digital logic, microcomputers, applied electronics and signals and systems. This embedded system course is centered on implementing a special purpose application using current micro controllers and their related support hardware and software. This course will use basic principles of systems engineering to develop a special purpose embedded system application, starting with systems requirements, high level block diagram and system function allocations, lower level system functions design and implementation, to systems simulation, integration and prototyping. The lab modules progressively build the expertise required to go through the design cycle. Express-PCB-SCH is used as a platform for implementing system simulation, schematic capture and design layout. Students will have an opportunity to go through the entire system engineering design cycle using this embedded systems design and development platform.  

Prerequisites: EG232/EG232L, EG351/EG351L, and EG332L. EG451-A Senior Design Project (3 credits)  

The purpose of the Senior Design Project is to provide students with design experience comparable with entry level engineering assignments or research experience comparable to entry level graduate research. The Senior Design projects are largely expected to address challenging engineering problems in a world area. The Senior Design projects will utilize a systems engineering approach to engineering project development. The Senior Research projects are largely expected to begin investigations of challenging problems preferably in a world area. The Senior Research projects will utilize scientific method to approach well formulated problems by faculty and corporate. A formal technical report or a research paper in support of a satisfactory presentation to peers and/or faculty must be completed prior to course grade submission.  

Prerequisites: Senior standing, EG325. EG451-B Senior Design Presentation (3 credits)  

The purpose of the Senior Design Presentation (3 credits) is to complete the work done on the student’s Senior Design Project. Substantial time is allotted for the senior design project or research write-up and for writing a paper publishable to a peer reviewed undergraduate journal. The student will also be preparing for the senior’s presentation or thesis defense which is part of the annual Physics & Engineering Seminar Series. 

Prerequisite: EG451-A. EG452 Applied Programming (3 credits)  

This course will provide an introduction to various high-level languages and interactive environments for numerical computation, visualization, and programming used by engineers and scientists to develop and/or simulate sophisticated systems. The students will be exposed to a variety of tools, and built-in math functions that will enable them to explore multiple approaches in order to reach a solution faster than with spreadsheets or traditional programming languages, such as C/C++ or Java™. The students will also be taught how to apply these programming environments in a wide range of applications, including signal processing and communications, image and video processing, control systems, test and measurements, computational finance, and computational biology. More than a million engineers and scientists in industry and academia use these programming environments as their primary language for technical computing and prototyping.  

Prerequisite: CS132. EG499 Independent Study (1–3 credits)  

Student may undertake a study in an area of interest with approval from the department chair. 

Program Type

Major, Minor

Degree

B.S., B.A.

Area of Study

Science

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Why Students Love Engineering

Portrait
Through Eastern Nazarene College’s Electrical Engineering Program, I am capable of one day designing technologies that will positively affect the lives of others. Be it poverty, overpopulation, or sustainability issues, all we need is a team of motivated, virtuous, highly educated individuals to work it out.”

Sebastian Arboleda, ‘20
Hometown: Barranquilla, Colombia

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